About your Search

20121205
20121205
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4
hillary clinton accepted the concept that every time we've raised capital gains tax, the receipts from that have gone down. every time we've lowered it, they've gone up. he accepted that. i want to know if his opinion is modified or is he considering laying off tax and business investment for fear that it will give us less of it. >> two very interesting questions there about what effect a change in taxes does to behavior. i think you can't deny the fact that it does change behavior. is there right. it is very complicated math. when they start saying it is math, it is really complicated math. you show me someone who can do that study -- >> it goes back to that idea, you raise a tax on something, you'll get less of it! >> no doubt about it. >> jim iuorio, thank you. >>> reminder -- do not miss steve leisman's exclusive interview with treasury secretary tim geithner. there won't be many more of these because mr. geithner has signaled he will be leaving. it is at 4:00 p.m. today eastern time. key man, the point man, on the administration side in the fiscal cliff negotiations. >>> bertha co
it be a 37% number? >> what we've proposed is to let the rates go back to the clinton era, which was a very good time. we think that's the mix. we think that makes the most sense. as i've said before, i'm very skeptical. there's a different way to do it that works economically. >> just as i understand it, not raising rates on the wealthy is something that you would be prepared to go all the way on in terms of going over the cliff. if the 39.6 number -- >> let me say it differently. congress needs to extends those tax cuts for all americans. they need to make sure no american who makes up to $250,000 a year is seeing their taxes go up. that's the most important thing people can do. remember, our obligation is first do no harm. we need to lift that threat over the economy. as part of that, along side that, we'd like to put in place, as i said, a carefully designed balance of reforms to put us on a path to sustainability. as long as there's recognition on the other side that those rates are going to go up at the end of this year, then we think we can reach an agreement on a set of reforms, as
these generalities. they'll close loopholes. it's a simple question, as president clinton said, of arithmetic. arithmetic. you can't get from here to there unless you raise the rates. >> so guys, that's where we are as of this morning, and now what everyone's waiting for is which side will make a concrete proposal here that actually includes some concessions? back to you. >> joining us from washington, d.c., jake sherman, congressional reporter for politico. who is going to make some honest concessions first? >> what eamon said is absolutely right. this comes down to one thing, whether republicans are willing to raise marginal income tax rates on americans. they're saying they're willing to raise revenue, but president obama has one criteria in this debate and that's raising income rates on all americans. right now, the sides are in their two corners on this and nobody is moving. so we're really only a couple weeks out and there's this huge gap, and eamon was right in another aspect. there is this brush fire of conservative lawmakers who don't want to raise revenue at all. so this is a huge p
for progressives, just to do it. to go back to the clinton era rates. you get rid of three quarters of the deficit just on tax increases at that point. >> and he says you get defense cuts. >> you can't get defense cuts any other way. and he's not the only one. there's a lot of people on the left and there's quite a few people on the right. i'm glad you're optimistic and a lot of ceos and guys in your position -- if you run a company, you don't need consumers petrified and business people petrified. this is the last thing we need if you run a company. i understand you have a horse in the game. >> but you also have the double trigger. if you go over the cliff, we've got the debt ceiling fight right afterwards. it's not like that's six months down the line. that's in if first month, six weeks of the new year. >> the other thing, depending on where you stand, the idea that we just get rid of congressional approval of the debt ceiling at all, which is that ludicrous proposal that was in the president's plan. that's not -- and would you really want that? would you really want not having any more oversig
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4